Tse Tsan Tai (1872–1938)
An Australian-Cantonese Opinion Maker in British Hong Kong
Author(s): Dong Wang

Examining the life of an Australian-Cantonese insurrectionist and patriot, this book explores a composite identity and democratic ideals which were shaped through diaspora, religion, colonialism, civil society, science, and revolutions in Qing and Nationalist China.

Collection: Asian Studies
 Publication Date  Available in all formats
ISBN 9781915271860
  Pages 290

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Description

Who was Tse Tsan Tai? Insurrectionist? Socialite? Patriot? Revolutionary?

Born and raised in Australia and trained in Anglo-Hong Kong’s civil service, Tse Tsan Tai (1872–1938) was all of these and more. A first native media man and anti-Qing patriot, he advocated independent thinking and a free China. Through the lens of his life, this book explores a composite identity, touching on themes of diaspora, religion, colonialism, civil society, science, and revolutions in Qing and Nationalist China.

Ideal reading for students of Asian Studies, East Asian Studies, Diaspora Studies, Chinese and Hong Kong History, international Relations, Indo-Pacific Studies, Colonial Studies, Cultural History, Sociology, and related courses, this fascinating course reading uses biography to ask the question: what were the original ideals for republicanism in China?

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About Book
Description

Who was Tse Tsan Tai? Insurrectionist? Socialite? Patriot? Revolutionary?

Born and raised in Australia and trained in Anglo-Hong Kong’s civil service, Tse Tsan Tai (1872–1938) was all of these and more. A first native media man and anti-Qing patriot, he advocated independent thinking and a free China. Through the lens of his life, this book explores a composite identity, touching on themes of diaspora, religion, colonialism, civil society, science, and revolutions in Qing and Nationalist China.

Ideal reading for students of Asian Studies, East Asian Studies, Diaspora Studies, Chinese and Hong Kong History, international Relations, Indo-Pacific Studies, Colonial Studies, Cultural History, Sociology, and related courses, this fascinating course reading uses biography to ask the question: what were the original ideals for republicanism in China?

Table of Contents
  • Cover
  • Half Title
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • v 
  • viiAcknowledgments
  • viiiix 
  • xxiContents
  • xiixiiiIntroduction
  • xxxiLearning objectives and discussion topics
  • 1 “A native of Sydney”
    • Australia and Chinese Australians
    • Canton –​ a caged tiger? “A rebellion center and mother of revolution”
    • One Hong Kong, two colonizers
  • 2 The 1911 revolution: a Christianized democratic China?14
    • Tse’s racism and nationalism
    • Nation versus government
    • Britain, Hong Kong, and Qing China’s power game
    • Sun Yat-​sen (1866–​1925)
  • 3 “The world’s great problem solved”32
    • Five historical situations
    • Creation myths, nationalism, and sino-​centrism
  • 4 Where business, culture, politics, and advocacy converged
    • Collector, dealer, and promoter of antiquities protection36
    • Businessman and industrialist
    • Constellations of friends and associates
    • United China?
  • 5 Conclusion: Chinas and the curse?
  • 6 Historical documents reading: excerpts of Tse Tsan Tai’s writings
    • I. The Chinese Republic. Secret History of the Revolution [中華民國革命秘史] 192452
      • The last of the Mings
      • The advent of the Manchus
      • Movements for independence
      • Meetings at headquarters
      • Appreciations
      • Introduction
        • Biographical sketch
      • My ambition
      • Sowing the seed
        • Arrival in China
        • Difficulties and dangers
        • The seed germinates
        • Organizing the revolution
          • (Abstracts from diaries and correspondence.)
        • Manifesto to Emperor Kwang Hsu
        • President of Provisional Govt. [sic]
        • Party split up
      • Unification of parties
        • Meeting between Kang Yu-​wei and Tse Tsan-​tai
        • Kang Yu-​wei
        • Meeting between Tse Tsan-​tai and Kang Kwang-​jin
        • A political confession
        • The Hongkong Chinese Club
        • Anti-​footbinding Society
        • Empress Dowager’s coup d’état
        • Martyrdom of Kang Kwang-​jin
      • Union and cooperation
        • Progress in the Yangtze Provinces
        • Meeting between Yeung Ku-​wan and Liang Chi-​chao
        • A political cartoon
        • The “Po Wang Whui” Society
      • Second attempt to capture Canton
        • A commonwealth government
      • The rescue of King Lien-​Shan
        • Tse Tsan-​tai meets Mrs. Archibald Little
        • The Wei Chow Movement
        • Li Hung Chang’s trap
        • The Ta Tung Movement
        • Assassination of Yeung Ku-​wan
        • Second attempt to capture Canton
        • Interview with Dr. G. E. Morrison
        • The rottenest government in existence
        • Meetings with Dr. G. E. Morrison
        • The betrayal
        • The S.C.M. Post, Ltd.
        • Death of Tse Yet-​chong
        • The World’s Chinese Students’ Federation
        • Dr. Yung Wing’s scheme
        • Sir Hiram S. Maxim
      • The revolution
        • The Wuchang Revolt and Li Yuan-​hung
        • Dr. Sun Yat-​sen elected Provisional President
        • Dr. Yung Wing’s advice
      • Abdication of the Manchus
        • China becomes a republic
        • D. Warres Smith’s remarkable letter
        • Death of Dr. Yung Wing, LL.D.
        • Dr. Timothy Richard on China
        • A Chinese national anthem
        • The national flag of the republic
        • Thos. H. Reid on the political situation
        • Yuan Shih-​kai elected president
        • Death of Yuan Shih-​kai
        • Death of Dr. G. E. Morrison
    • II. The Creation. The Real Situation of Eden and The Origin of the Chinese. Hong Kong: Kelly & Walsh, 1914.66
      • Introduction
      • The Garden of Eden and the Cradle of the Human Race
      • The Garden of Eden
      • The Cradle of the Human Race
      • The Creation
      • The peopling of the world
      • The beginning of civilization
    • 五帝紀 The Record of the Five Patriarchs of China
      • I. –​Fuhi (Henoch)
      • II. –​Nü Wa (Noah)
        • The real Mount Ararat
        • The re-​peopling of the world
        • The great antiquity of the Chinese
        • The origin of the Chinese and the religion of the Chinese
        • The religion of the Chinese
      • III. –​ Shen Nung (Shem)
      • VI. –​Hwang Ti (Arphaxad)
      • V. –​ Yao (Reu)
        • The origin of the Jews
        • China’s indigenous civilization
        • Universal peace and the brotherhood of man
    • Appendix: Why God has punished Europe
    • III Ancient Chinese Art. A Treatise on Chinese Painting. Hong Kong: South China Morning Post, pp. 18, 1928.
      • Introduction
      • Chapter 1: Origin
      • Chapter 2: Development
      • Chapter 3: Technique
      • Chapter 4: Schools
      • Chapter 5: Masters
      • Chapter 6: Foreign criticism
      • Conclusion
  • 223Notes
  • 235Bibliography
  • 244Index
Author Bio

Dong Wang PhD is a historian of China, U.S.-Chinese relations, geopolitics, and geoculture. She is visiting fellow at Freie Universität in Berlin, research associate at the Harvard Fairbank Center (since 2002), a member of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, and an elected Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Her books in English include The United States and China (2021, 2nd rev. ed. of 2013), Longmen’s Stone Buddhas and Cultural Heritage (2020), Managing God’s Higher Learning (2007), and China’s Unequal Treaties (2005).

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