Advocating for Queer and BIPOC Survivors of Rape at Public Universities  
The #ChangeRapeCulture Movement

Highlights stories from BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+ sexual violence survivors at public universities to advocate for their rights

Open Access: BY-NC-ND
 Publication Date  Available in all formats
ISBN 9781916704152
  Pages 96

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Description

How can stories from BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+ sexual violence survivors at public universities help us to advocate for their rights and dismantle harmful stereotypes?

Every survivor of sexual abuse has a story to tell. Set up in 2019 at the University of Texas at San Antonio by queer Black students, The #ChangeRapeCulture movement works to champion the national conversation about rape culture at American universities.

Advocating for Queer and BIPOC Survivors of Rape at Public Universities documents the stories of BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+ sexual violence survivors and offers theoretical groundings, model strategies, and practical solutions to aid understanding of rape culture at public universities, and advocate for survivors’ rights.

Student-led and survivor centred, this book is ideal reading for students of Queer and LGBT+ Studies, Gender Studies, Education Studies, Social Work, and Rhetoric, as well as student activists and university administrators.

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About Book
Description

How can stories from BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+ sexual violence survivors at public universities help us to advocate for their rights and dismantle harmful stereotypes?

Every survivor of sexual abuse has a story to tell. Set up in 2019 at the University of Texas at San Antonio by queer Black students, The #ChangeRapeCulture movement works to champion the national conversation about rape culture at American universities.

Advocating for Queer and BIPOC Survivors of Rape at Public Universities documents the stories of BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+ sexual violence survivors and offers theoretical groundings, model strategies, and practical solutions to aid understanding of rape culture at public universities, and advocate for survivors’ rights.

Student-led and survivor centred, this book is ideal reading for students of Queer and LGBT+ Studies, Gender Studies, Education Studies, Social Work, and Rhetoric, as well as student activists and university administrators.

Table of Contents
  • Cover
  • Half Title
  • Title Page
  • Dedication
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Trigger warning
  • Introduction
  • Learning objectives
  • 1 The benefits of having autistic foster carers
    • Why might autistic people make good foster carers?
    • Cognitive strengths
  • 2 Perceptual differences
    • Attitude problem
    • Masking
    • Different initial premises
    • Attempting to understand
    • Predetermined expectations
    • Can autistics have a sense
of humour?
    • Echolalia
    • Reasonable adjustments
  • 3 Executive functioning differences
    • What is executive functioning?
      • Working memory
      • Planning and organisation
      • Staying focused
      • Impulse inhibition
      • Time management
    • Reasonable adjustments
  • 4 Social differences
    • The social aspect of fostering
    • Spoon theory
    • Social hangover
    • Sensory aspect
    • Small talk
    • Words for information
    • Info-​dumping
    • Gossip
    • Reasonable adjustments
      • Events and occasions
      • A day trip out: too much –​ we will not have the spoons for it
      • Training sessions
      • Foster carer support groups
  • 5 Truth differences
    • Gaslighting
    • Twisting
    • Triangulation
    • Intentional omissions
    • Projection
    • Name calling
    • Theories treated as fact
    • Labelling
    • Changing minds, or information, without telling anyone –​ making the new information the only information
    • Using threats or coercion
    • Disregarding verifiable facts
    • Misdirection
    • How this looks in practice 
as an autistic foster carer in 
social services
    • Reasonable adjustments
  • 6 Rule differences
    • Is it or is it not a rule?
    • Policy and procedure rules
    • General rules on children
or teenagers
    • Timeframe rules
    • Communication rule
    • Reasonable adjustments
  • 7 Autistic overwhelm
    • Meltdown, shutdown,
and burnout
      • Meltdown
      • Shutdown
      • Autistic burnout
    • Reasonable adjustments
      • Meltdown
      • Shutdown
      • Burnout
  • Conclusion
    • Understanding
    • Stress
    • Empathy and double 
empathy issue
    • Equality and legality
      • Communication
      • Reciprocal social interaction
    • Some statistics
    • What do we want in a foster carer?
    • My top three wishes
  • Recommended assignments and discussion questions
  • References
  • Recommended further reading
  • Glossary
  • Index
Author Bio

Taylor Waits (She/they) is cofounder of #ChangeRapeCulture and a PhD student studying Philosophy for Rhetoric and Writing at the University of Pittsburgh.

Kimiya Factory (She/her) is cofounder of #ChangeRapeCulture and holds a BA in Political Science and a minor in Legal Studies from the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Coreen Hale (She/her) is Programme Director at #ChangeRapeCulture and holds a B.S. in Psychology from Loyola University.

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